Tucker homestead dedicates historical marker

April 17, 2013

by Carla Noah Stutsman

This historical marker will be dedicated Sunday, April 21, at 2 p.m. at the Tucker House, 6245 Tucker Drive.

This historical marker will be dedicated Sunday, April 21, at 2 p.m. at the Tucker House, 6245 Tucker Drive.


Years of hard work on the part of a few dedicated historians will be rewarded Sunday, April 21 at 2 p.m. when a State Historic Marker is unveiled and dedicated at the Tucker House, 6245 Tucker Drive south of Azle.
The public is invited to share in the celebration. A house tour and reception will follow the ceremony.
The Texas Historical Commission approved the marker a few months ago, but members of the Silver Creek Heritage Society, who applied for the marker, had to wait for the monument to be cast before making plans for its formal dedication.
According to members of the society, including Nancy Talmage Foust and Patsy Harvey Glover, the Tucker House and property are among the oldest documented homesteads in the area still standing.
The Tucker House was built about 1889 by brothers Virgil Jasper (“V.J.”) and Jerry Tucker.
V.J. and Jerry were two of eight children born to the original homesteader, Moses Tucker and his wife, Martha Cogburn Tucker.
V.J. was born after his father’s return from the Civil War, where he represented Parker County Company E, 19th Texas Cavalry.
His father’s 1856 homestead remains in the family about one mile north of the Tucker House and is owned by great-great-granddaughter Norlene Wright Carter.
V.J. was a cotton farmer who turned to dairy farming after losing his crops to a hailstorm in the 1920s. He lived in the Tucker House from about 1890 until his death in 1946.
V.J. and his wife, Emma Allen Tucker, raised five children – Fay, Mose, Lorene, Guy, and Loyce – in the home.
V.J. served as Parker County Precinct 1 Commissioner in 1922 and also as a trustee for the Slover School, located about three miles from what is now Silver Creek Elementary School.
Guy Tucker took over the property upon the death of his father.
The Cleo Wright, Clark Trichell, Denzil Wright, Virgil Wright and Harold Wright families are among those who have lived and dairied on the Tucker farm over the years.
A photo of Mose Tucker, one of the children born in the home, hangs above the fireplace in the Tucker House. It was donated to the society by granddaughter Joan Tucker Campbell.
The piano in the front room was part of the original furnishings in the home. It was moved to V.J.’s oldest daughter, Fay’s, home when she married Claud Wright in 1915, and then to the home of Fay’s daughter, Vonnie Wright Holmes, who donated it back to Tucker House.
Another Tucker granddaughter, Norlene Wright Carter, was instrumental in obtaining the marker, Foust said.
Carter was relentless in her pursuit of a historical designation for years, until her parents became ill. She picked up the ball again last year and helped get it done.
Tucker House was donated to the Silver Creek Heritage Society by Ann Tucker Moody, daughter of Guy and Julia Sharpe Tucker and granddaughter of V.J. and Emma Tucker.
Moody was also instrumental in securing the marker, and still owns another Tucker family home just down the road from Tucker House.

Built in 1889, the Tucker House is one of the oldest homes remaining in the area.

Built in 1889, the Tucker House is one of the oldest homes remaining in the area.

Category: Community Archived

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